Monday, December 26, 2011

snaa

last night she was there, again
it's like nothing has changed
except that it was a dream
and i wake u screaming
wishing how it would be true
it's amazing
how someone's presence
could affect you

Monday, November 7, 2011

There goes our English

by Fuad Hafis

If you are one of the many RapidKL train commuters in KL, I’m sure you have listened to the recent announcement about the new MyRapid card in the trains. The message was simple – get a new card. But it definitely was not a simple task for the guy who did the announcement, because he can’t even speak proper English. It was full of umms, aahs, and can be considered as a noise pollution. Either RapidKL management did not have a standard script for its staff, or it’s just a side effect of relying too much on subtitles when watching TV.

And surely this has got a lot to do with our education system. Scrapping PPSMI is a bad move. But then again, why just science and mathematics? I mean, why do students get to learn English only through two subjects? Is English not important enough that it is treated as a second-class language? Maybe we should replace it with an all-English education system, like English-medium schools, for example. That would be great, yes? Youngsters can finally speak fluent English, and they can have a better future. I’m not implying that not being able to communicate in English hinders you from having a good life, but yes, hundreds of thousands of graduates out there are unemployable, so you know where I’m heading to, right? There are many job opportunities out there, yet sadly, we suck.

I’m sure all of us have seen people around us, especially youngsters, struggling to communicate in English, and that’s just a sad sight. Let alone sharing jokes that only sounds right in English, but that’s not the point. Wait, that is the point! Not being able to master this language means lack of job opportunity, holds you back socially, and most importantly you won’t be able to learn new things fast enough.

The funny thing is, I don’t think the Education Ministry understands the gravity of the situation. Its latest decision meant that students between Year Three and Form Five next year would be allowed the option of learning science and mathematics in Bahasa Malaysia, English or both languages. This would translate into millions of confused students. Does this mean that teachers can choose which language to use when teaching? And how about exams, do they have to make two sets of question papers too – one for each language? If yes, that means a lot of money. Our tax money. And even that cannot guarantee our kids English proficiency, or in other words, quality education.

That means, the circle of youngsters that will have a brighter future would be the ones brought up in English-speaking families, or the ones sent to private schools. Well, if that’s the price I’m going to pay to ensure my kids get the best education, why not? But certainly not everyone can afford the school fees that cost a bomb. In the end, only the rich can afford quality education, and would further widen the gap between classes. And it all starts with English education. See how much are we affected by one single decision by someone at the top?

So, yes, sometimes we laugh at some advertisements with terrible English and at announcers who can’t even speak properly and confidently. But it’s not their fault. You know who to blame.

Monday, August 8, 2011

technology ruined our lives?

Hi girls (and guys), i am on mc. So screw all of you. Lol kidding2. Bored to death, i want to share with you this.

We are slaves of technology. Yes, very true. We are too reliant on it, so much that without it, our lives are screwed. I mean us, the younger generation. Take gps for example. All we need to do is to just key in the destination, and voila, the direction is there. There's no need to rely on the stupid malaysian signboards which are, either blocked by a 100 year-old tree, or posted with ahlong's adverts. Cool. And smart way to travel indeed. But what happens when the signal is lost? Or when you forgot to bring your gps? You curse like a rabid racist, driving nervously around kl, the place you grew up in, as if you've never been in kl. Right? Right.

And smartphones too. Thanks to blackberries and iphones, all your work, data, contacts and, porn *cough* are saved in your smartphones. Right? So what happens when you are in an emergency on the road, and you need to call your close friend, but your phone is dead. What would you do? Find a nearest public phone, insert the coin, and dial the number, right? What number? Oh the one in my phone, lemme check..ah shit the phone died. (and you're screwed, again). Right? Right.

Too much reliance on technology has resulted in weaker and shorter memory spans. That's because we don't need to remember anything. Everything's on the net, on the phone. So it's no wonder that our parents have better memory. Sigh. Ok ok too much cough syrup, i need to sleep.

Sunday, August 7, 2011

mic rules!

When i was a kid, there was this old indian guy who lived somewhere in kl. He was sick and his liver was failing. The doctors told him that unless he undergo a surgery he will die.

But the cost was RM50,000. Something like that. And he ain't got no money.

So what he did was, he wrote a letter to god. "god, help me, i'm poor. I need money". He posted the letter, and it went to pos malaysia (duh.). The head of pos malaysia didn't know what to do with the letter, so he forwarded the letter to barisan nasional.

Bn, headed by then tun dr m, too, didn't know what to do, but he asked samy from mic to handle it, since it's about the indian and it would be proper if it is to be handled by the indian congress.

So samy, with all his power and influences, collected money for the poor indian uncle. But they only managed to collect RM40;000. Samy, now smiling, after accomplishing something significant (after all these years), sent the money to the poor indian uncle.

A few days later, another letter to god was received by pos malaysia. It read, "dear god, thank you so much for giving me the money for the surgery. But it's not enough. Next time do not send it through mic, they will take 20%".

(fiction. My mom told me when i was a kid. Yeaaa, i know.)

Saturday, July 9, 2011

the rally in kl.

the bersih 2.0 rally. Yes, that one. Of course, in the
news (especially the ones on tv) potray the activists
as being moronic, aggressive and people of lost
cause. Well, yea if that's what you want to believe. For me, personally, it's for expressing your rights. You know what is right for all of us, if you think about it.

A few friends of mine went for the rally. And thank goodness, they were safe. They were like my eyes and ears. And they inspire me. I wish i could be bolder like them. They risked their safety for something they believe in. And i'm proud of them.

And even if the objectives of the rally didn't go through, at least they tried. They went there,
shouting, demanding, doing something, facing
possible risks. Rather than sitting in the comfy sofa and do nothing and complaining. If only more of us are like them.

If only the media could potray the real scenario, telling people the news as it is.

For a better malaysia tomorrow.

Saturday, June 25, 2011

racism bring us closer.

to many people it would be difficult to laugh at a racist joke without being looked at by other people. it's like..you know it's so funny, and you wanted to laugh. in fact you actually giggled at that joke but pretended that it's not funny because the joke itself could offend other people. okay. how about a joke about your people, then? do you laugh and accept the joke or pretend that you're now offended, putting off any future jokes about your skin color, your nose, your eyes, or hair, or the fact that "no, i don't smell like curry!" thing?

while politician make a big fuss out of our races, it's actually fun. i mean, fun looking at those morons yelling their lungs out in the Dewan, tearing their vocal chords in the process. and it's fun because, since we live in malaysia there's so much to talk about the other races. you know, the stereotypes and all that.

there's this friend of mine, he's not exactly a racist. but his jokes are full of it. and those jokes are targeted at, apparently, indians. although he himself is part indian. or maybe it's just his tendency to shake his body when he speaks. funny yet offensive to some people. for example, he'd ask you questions like these, "hey, what do you call indians standing together in a line on a wall?", so i said "i don't know", and he said "a barcode". yeah! i know right? he has all sorts of racist jokes that, even when he's asking me serious things, my responds to him would almost always, yes, racist. sometimes he could be out of line, but you can't blame him. i mean, he can't even see his waistline!

but hey, that's how we knew each other. and our circle of friends generally known as the wroughtoners. we are culturally diverse - malays, indians and chinese (duh) and portuguese, baba, robot etc, with various beliefs like islam, christianity, agnostics, freethinkers, buddhism, witches. ok, the last one's not true. so as you can see, the diverse culture and background we have should make us socially well-mannered and respectful among us? well, not really. we diss each other with racist remarks that would put russell peters to shame. but in doing so we get to bond. we know each other even better. and we still hangout whenever we get the chance.

so people have been asking me, like "dude aren't you offended?" and i'm like dude chill it's just a joke! and sometimes the jokes can be a bit painful, there's always someone to blame - the government. yes, thanks government. your subsidy and all your *cough* affirmative action *cough* undermine every success a malay like me gets on his own right. so i sometimes get the subsidy joke, like "even if you die the government will subsidise your funeral!" and i can't help but burst into laughter. it's so damn funny although it's not true. screw you stereotypes. and yes, to answer your question, no i don't get offended, simply because i can get back at them. lol. in fact, i consider myself a malaysian, not a malay.

but it doesn't mean that if we enjoy racist jokes it means we're racist. that's entirely a different thing. and we're not racist. we embrace our differences. and that's what the people up there in the dirty politic world should learn - we defy differences by being together as one.

Sunday, February 20, 2011

oh the humanity

it's very tiring,
to hear and see by not even trying,
they wanna differentiate us by race religion and the like,
causing unrests riots protests and the like.

but it only happens if we are treated unequally,
when our rights are dismissed so easily,
so what happens if we can never walk,
what our fathers used to talk?

if you read books from the shelf,
you'll know history repeats itself,
what happened in egypt and tunisia,
aint that reminding you of...old russia?

whatever you wanna find,
i hope you aint losing your mind,
since both sides are full of shit,
choose only the ones that can bring it.

Tuesday, February 8, 2011

A Right To My Opinion

“If you hate this country so much, find another that would take you!” That was one of the responses I received from a middle-aged person after reading my previous article. For some reason, I was taken aback because firstly, the person obviously didn’t get what I was talking about, and secondly as a non-partisan I was judged as being unpatriotic simply because I choose to form my own opinions rather than blindingly agree to whatever poetry the media is spouting.

Such is the case that even without amending the Printing Presses and Publications Act, our opinions and views of matters are repressed by the society itself, believing that being patriotic is to trust the ruling government without question. Does it mean that if I trust the government I can’t voice out my concerns? They should be thankful that younger generations like me have at least some interest in politics, after whatever that has been going on right now.

Doesn’t it seem that you are biased and hypocrite when you agree to everything the political party of your choice does, even when you know it’s somewhat wrong? It seems to me that you have an opinion that I don’t have my own opinion. If I’m wrong, then let’s have a rational discussion, rather by labeling me as being unpatriotic. That’s the last resort for someone who has no argument.

Of course how we think depends on what we read and what we are exposed to. If you read quality, unbiased & insightful articles you’d likely to develop intellectual unbiased views, whereas if you read rubbish hear-say blogs (you know, the ones that justify their arguments by using profanities and child-like sentences) you’d most likely talk nonsense and be biased. The more you read and exposures you get, the more likely you’d form your own opinions. In turn, while you enjoy your teh tarik at a nearby mamak with your friends, you’d realize that both the government and the opposition are power-crazed people, but “you’ll have to choose the lesser evil of the two,” quoting what my friend said to me the other day.

Unlike in 1997 when we would primarily be updated with news only from newspapers and TV which are (still is) controlled by the ruling government, we now have almost unlimited access (save for some unreliable broadband services) to the internet, feeding us news from all sides, giving us the opportunity to form our own understandings based on issues and cases are presented, that will affect our voting decisions. The vast amount of information grants us powers to literally choose the next government, which are among the reasons why the Act is to be amended soon, that is to block views which are likely to cause political instability.

I’m generally okay with that. Go ahead; block those online publications that could create unrest, or the ones that considered detrimental to national development. But I must say, is it wrong to be informed, sir? I have another question - if we are controlled as to what and how to think, how would we ever be smart enough to know what is right or wrong?

“You’re too young, boy. You don’t know what you’re talking about”, said another. Sure, I may be young, but I certainly know how to make up my own mind. Count me in, add several zeros and you’ll have thousands of young informative people capable to think independently. It’s quite ironic that they say we’re immature and misguided when political parties, at the same time, are desperate to get young voters like us to register with them, knowing for sure we actually know pretty well.

What I’m trying to point out is pretty simple – while we may have different political beliefs we also need to understand that we can’t just be mindless robots. Most of the times we need to flip the coin to see the other side, that way we will be able to see the bigger picture.

Here’s a quote from Donald Trump - people who are capable of thinking for themselves will rarely be part of any herd.

Friday, January 14, 2011

to my dear friend.

{ we've lost contact for nearly five years, and finally i met her this week, and then she's gone again.}

cinta memang sesuatu yang indah.
bila jumpa orang yang kita suka
dan orang tu suka balik
rasa macam semua dugaan tu senang
masalah dikongsi bersama
melakar masa depan berdua
hidup lebih ceria.
dan juga cinta ni menyusahkan.
bila masalah datang
hati rasa berat
kepala pening
tak sedap hati
tak tenteram
rasa nak menangis
nak menjerit
semua datang serentak.
dan semuanya kerana seseorang yang kita sayangi
walaupun bertahun berlalu
tapi masih add memori manis yang boleh dikenang
lalu air mata bergenang.
hidup rasa kosong dan murung
nak lari dari masalah
kita keje sampai lewat malam
hati pedih derita kita seorang saja yang rasa
hinggalah muncul seorang lagi dalam hidup
dan semua ni bermula semua.

Saturday, January 8, 2011

the sad things

{this article was first written on my facebook notes right before the new year, and it went up on Malaysian Insider on the 4th of January, 2011(http://www.themalaysianinsider.com/breakingviews/article/the-sad-things-fuad-hafis/), and i received great responses and a LOT of recommendations.and now to make it a full circle, this very article of mine, my very first politic-related article, enters my blog. enjoy}

I wonder what’s wrong with Malaysian politics nowadays.

Politicians from both sides, especially of the Pakatan Rakyat, claims and argues on pretty much petty things, such as 1 Malaysia and One Israel, the 1 Malaysia logo on billboard ads in Selangor, the APCO, racism issue between Utusan and Guan Eng, and most recently PAS Selising’s Drs Saipul Bahrin Mohamad who challenged UMNO to show evidence that he was caught for adultery on a train.

What is wrong with these people? Why do they need to argue on little matters that have no impact on the development of the country? Or our safety for that matter? They are so occupied with attacking their counterparts that they most of the times ignore common people, like us, that they should be working for.

Instead of arguing on 1 Malaysia concept, wherever it came from, let’s focus on transportation issue. Our bus drivers suck really bad. 61 bus passengers died since October. The funny thing is, only AFTER the recent incident in Cameron Highlands that the authorities have decided that they will set up an independent investigation body to find out the reason. Should it actually be done way back in October, at least?

As if there is a special quota they need to reach before deciding on this matter.

In fact, there’s a joke that the percentage of deaths relating to buses are way 1000 per cent higher than that of an airplane. Also, when we talk about transportation, it always reminds me of the taxis. You know the ones with the sticker on the rear doors that says “no haggling” BUT the drivers mostly will never accept the passengers except when the passengers agree to a fare mentioned by the drivers.

Awful lot, indeed. And JPJ never took action about that, let alone strict enforcements. And the politicians don’t even bother about it.

Not to mention the always-late-on-arrival KTM commuter service, which I bet Airasia has a better reputation.

Instead of arguing about creating an Islamic state, they should work together with the government on something that contributes to better economy, such as help maintaining food prices affordable for us. Most Malaysians earn less than RM1500. I should add further that the government or the opposition should take this opportunity to work with MTUC to propose the implementation of minimum wage policy. But they don’t. They’d prefer to talk about the next by-elections.

Speaking of elections, while the university and college students are not allowed to participate in politics regardless of their age, 11 years old can get married in Malaysia. Is this a joke? Come on. Does it make sense that the little girl, who’s not taken UPSR yet, is given the right to enter into an agreement that will change her life completely, while the university and college students with brains that are supposed to create a better future, can’t take part in politics!

As for child marriage, what’s the purpose of labelling movies with 18SX or 18PL, then? Aren’t we supposed to protect kids from paedophiles?

Can’t our politician make some policies for this? As for the students, aren’t we supposed to prepare them for leading us in the future, because if so, why don’t let them start early? No wonder these students are not interested with politics in Malaysia, because the politics didn’t care about them.

Instead of igniting and reigniting the issue of racism, they should focus instead on making sure we Malaysians can get to sleep at night, soundly, without worry of waking up tomorrow for another day. On Dec 22nd, a fresh mart owner was shot dead in his car by a motorcycle pillion rider in Jalan USJ 1/1, Subang Jaya. Another in Kuantan on the 23rd December, a contractor was found dead with slash wounds on his neck at his house in Lorong Sekilau, while in Ipoh, a sundry shop owner was killed after he was stabbed in the chest in a tussle with robber. These happen every other day. So why can’t the politicians focus on reducing crime instead? Prove to us that they are as useful as we thought. (yes, thought, we no longer think they can). Oh we can still rely on the police! Oh wait, don’t! They’ll shoot us!

I’ve just graduated, and frankly, I’m not interested with our local politics scene. Tell me why I should, because when I wake up in the morning, it’s always the same. Because maybe the saying is true: Politicians and diapers have one thing in common – they need to be changed regularly... and for the same reason, at that.